Hello and welcome to my page, I am a Ceramic Artist


 Taught by Rudy Autio one of America's great ceramic artists, D’Arcy Margesson has been a practicing potter for over thirty years now. He went to the Alberta College of Art Calgary where he completed a four year programme with a ceramics major. During his stay in Alberta, D'Arcy has developed practical skills necessary to work as a studio potter and lead to his life-long interest and fascination with the beauty of ceramic glazes.  He has taught a course on glaze chemistry ( for all temperature ranges), along with courses on throwing, tableware and atmospheric firing at  Emily Carr University of Art and Design, this has been a been a way for him to continue to explore his interest in glazes and pass on an appreciation of their mystery and beauty to many students.

Collections:

                                                  Ceramic Museum, Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver, B.C.

                                                  Canadian Craft Museum, Vancouver, B.C.

                                                  Alberta College of Art, permanent collection, Calgary, Ab.

                                                  Alberta Potters Assoc., Edmonton, Ab.

                                                  Alberta Art Foundation, Edmonton, Ab.

Margesson, D'Arcy

Contact Details


  Margesson, D'Arcy

  Gibsons, British Columbia, Canada

Samples of my work

Artist Statement

All of my pottery is hand-thrown on my beloved old kick wheel, and made from a clay body that I have formulated to give my pottery the strength to stand up to the demands of everyday use( including the dishwasher). Each pot is individually decorated, using a white slip that is applied to the leather hard pot, and then using a sharp piece of wood ( imagine a pencil without the lead), I draw back through the slip to the terracotta clay to create the drawing. After bisquing the pots( firing them in the kiln to 1750 F), I apply coloured transparent glazes and then fire them again to 1950 F, this second firing melts the gaze into a glass and produces a hard durable clay body, with the characteristic terracotta colour. 

My Current Exhibitions: